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Low-Interaction Games

Discussion in 'Adventure Games' started by Ray Ivey, Jul 30, 2013.

  1. Ray Ivey

    Ray Ivey Member

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    How do you guys feel about games that are more digital storytelling than gaming? I recently played "To the Moon," and, while I enjoyed it, I think you could make the argument that it's barely a game. I don't think there's necessarily anything wrong with this, but I wondered how my other adventure players felt?
     
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  2. Fnord

    Fnord Member

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    I quite like them. It is not something that I would like to have instead of my regular games, but every once in a while I do enjoy a game that is mainly story with only hints of gameplay. The little bit of interactivity there is helps me focus on the game and prevents my mind from wandering, which is why I would rather play a low-interaction game than watch a movie.
     
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  3. Colpet

    Colpet Member

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    So far I haven't been tempted by these type of games. I've always played games for the challenge and exploration. Story is low on my requirement list. Don't get me wrong, I read a ton, but maybe just enjoy stories in the traditional manner.
    How does digital storytelling differ from watching a movie or a show? I would think it's more like that than a game.
     
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  4. markornikov

    markornikov Member

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    it would be great if such game would still have branching storylines and multiple outcomes.
    Interactivity, no matter how small, is the distinction between a game and a movie or book.
     
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  5. Tincup2

    Tincup2 Member

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    What Colpet says. I don't turn to pc gaming for a story heavy experience. I read and watch TV/movies for that, and maybe the occasional graphic novel. I want to flesh out a game world and it's possible meaning and message through exploration, discovery, musing, pondering, and of course puzzles. Often times enigma and mystery is preferable to storybook closure or narrative logic - no I take that back - it usually it is.

    I find it tedious to have the plot continuously fed me by voice actors [Dracula 3 so far fits this category but I press on]. Classic adventures weren't immune either - ie, too much 'diary reading' to propel the story and to fill in details, but the best ones struck an acceptable balance.
     
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  6. Jenny100

    Jenny100 Member

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    If I want to play a game, I want to solve puzzles and explore the virtual world. This doesn't mean I'd never enjoy something that's essentially an interactive story -- just not when I'm feeling like playing a game.
     
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  7. Andromus

    Andromus Member

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    I'm with Fnord here. "To the Moon" was wonderful, and the sort of thing that's a nice change of pace every once in awhile, but I need more gameplay the majority of the time.
     
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  8. Tincup2

    Tincup2 Member

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    I haven't played TtM moon but I'm sure it's a great game from what I've heard. The problem for me is that wordy/themed/interactive/story oriented games seem to be the norm nowadays and the old style, quiet, low-interactive, point and clicks the rare 'change of pace'.
     
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  9. Quester

    Quester New Member

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    They don't make much sense to me. Why not just make a movie? To The Moon wanted me to "play" as a guy who doesn't stop talking, doing his walking for him and a few tasks. I don't see the point.
     
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  10. Tincup2

    Tincup2 Member

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    Exactly, that's my problem with games that make up your character for you. I want a game where I enter into the adventure as myself.. But apparently it's tough for game developers to leave us alone... they always want to append an avatar to us...
     
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  11. Jenny100

    Jenny100 Member

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    Going by the answers in this post, "low interaction" can mean different things to different people.
    To me "low interaction" means you can't interact with the game -- not just that you can't interact with other characters, but that you can't collect or manipulate objects (no puzzles or very few). Examples would be ***Gadget*** and ***Legend of Lotus Spring***, where you mainly just click to advance the story (you click objects to learn how they are connected to the story, not to collect or use the object). Maybe "To the Moon" is the same way, but I haven't played it.
     
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  12. Tincup2

    Tincup2 Member

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    That's an important distinction - low interaction with 'things' or few puzzles is usually a problem - though Gadget was quite wonderful.
     
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  13. CrisGer

    CrisGer Member

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    Actually text games were the very first form of adventure game and have a lot of history, Nice to see that they remain around. And there are additions to and adjuncts for famous games that are text only including a story prologue for the very early classic "Loom". good idea to cover it here. the topic.
     
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